• 10.00am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London
National Army Museum
  • 10.00am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London

The Welfare of the British Armed Forces During the Seven Years War

Marquess of Granby relieving a sick soldier, 1765

Join Professor Erica Charters as she discusses the significance of disease and medicine during Britain’s first global war.

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Often referred to as the first global conflict, the Seven Years War spanned North America, the West Indies, Europe, and India. In these locations, diseases such as scurvy, smallpox, and yellow fever were far more deadly than combat, stretching the resources of the competing states.

In this fascinating talk, Professor Erica Charters will discuss the vital role that disease played in shaping British strategy and campaigning decisions. She will look at how military medicine was a crucial component to the British war effort, and how the government was prompted to attend more closely to the welfare of its armed forces.

About Erica Charters

Professor Erica Charters is Professor of the Global History of Medicine at Oxford University. Her research examines the history of war, disease, and bodies, particularly in the British and French empires. She is the coordinator for the Oxford and Empire project and is on the editorial boards of the 'British Journal of Military History' and 'Centaurus'.

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