• 10am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London
National Army Museum
  • 10am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London

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The Battle of the Boyne, 1690
The Battle of the Boyne, 1690
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Battle of the Boyne

Fought on 1 July 1690 between the forces of the deposed King James II and his successor, King William III, the Battle of the Boyne was the largest military engagement ever to take place on Irish soil.

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Cap badge, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), 1914

The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (West Riding)

This infantry regiment was formed during the 1881 Army reforms. It continued in service until 2006, when it merged with The Green Howards and The Prince of Wales’s Own Regiment of Yorkshire to form The Yorkshire Regiment.

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Glengarry badge, 76th Regiment of Foot, c1874

76th Regiment of Foot

This infantry regiment was raised in 1787. It continued in British Army service until the 1881 reforms, when it was amalgamated with the 33rd (The Duke of Wellington’s) Regiment of Foot to form The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (West Riding).

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Glengarry badge, 33rd (The Duke of Wellington’s) Regiment, c1874

33rd (The Duke of Wellington's) Regiment of Foot

This infantry unit was formed in 1702. It served in many British Army campaigns until the 1881 reforms, when it merged with the 76th Regiment of Foot to form The Duke of Wellington’s Regiment (West Riding) in 1881.

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Other ranks’ cap badge, The East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York’s Own), c1898

The East Yorkshire Regiment (The Duke of York’s Own)

This infantry unit was raised in 1685 and served in many British Army campaigns during its long history. In 1958, it merged with The West Yorkshire Regiment to form The Prince of Wales’s Own Regiment of Yorkshire.

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Cap badge, The Devonshire Regiment, c1917

The Devonshire Regiment

This infantry unit was raised in 1685 and subsequently served in many British Army campaigns during its long history. In 1958, it was amalgamated with the Dorset Regiment to form the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment.

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Glengarry badge, other ranks, 14th (The Buckinghamshire) (The Prince of Wales’s Own) Regiment of Foot, 1874-81

The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales’s Own)

This infantry unit was raised in 1685 and served in many British Army campaigns during its long history. In 1958, it merged with The East Yorkshire Regiment to form The Prince of Wales’s Own Regiment of Yorkshire.

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The Battle of Vinegar Hill, 21 June 1798

Irish Rebellion of 1798

In 1798, an underground republican group known as the Society of United Irishmen instigated a major uprising against British rule in Ireland. Although the revolt ended in total defeat for the rebels, it marked a significant watershed in Irish history.

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Bearskin badge, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys), c1900s

Regimental badges

Soldiers’ headwear has always featured some form of insignia demonstrating regimental identity. Here we take a look at some common features of these badge designs, investigating the origins and meaning behind their words and symbols.

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Cap badge, The Royal Welsh Regiment, 2019

The Royal Welsh

This infantry regiment was formed in 2006 by merging the Royal Regiment of Wales and the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Since then, it has served on several deployments including the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Replacement VC group awarded to Private Francis FitzPatrick, 94th Regiment, 1879-1900

Lost and found: A tale of two VCs

The medals of Private Francis Fitzpatrick, an Irish-born Victoria Cross hero, have recently been reunited at the National Army Museum after more than a century of separation.

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Soldiers of The 3rd (East Kent) Regiment of Foot (The Buffs) defending the Colours at Albuera, 1811

Save the Colours!

Colours have been the focus of some of the most bitter fighting and magnificent acts of heroism in British Army history. Soldiers often fought to the last to preserve them in battle, and they continue to hold totemic significance for regiments today.

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The Royal Artillery Memorial, Hyde Park Corner, London, 1925

Honouring the fallen

After the First World War, British society had to come to terms with the loss of huge numbers of its service personnel. Across the country, people found ways to commemorate the fallen at a local and national level.

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"First time @NAM_London today. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Thought the presentation & interpretation made the subject accessible..."