• CLOSED
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London
  • CLOSED
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London

Rise of the Phoenix: The Burma Campaign of 1945

4th Gurkha Rifles crossing the River Irrawaddy in Burma, 1945

Join esteemed academic Daniel Marston at this exclusive members’ event as he discusses his latest work on the 1945 Burma Campaign and the transformation of the British Indian Army.

Attend in person:

Watch online:

  • All members will receive an email explaining how to watch the event online.

In 1945, British, Indian and African soldiers served alongside local allies to inflict on the Imperial Japanese Army in Burma its worst ever defeat.

The exploits of General Slim and his Fourteenth Army resulted in one of the most brilliant and original operations conducted by any British commander in the 20th century.

The Burma Campaign may not have contributed directly to Japan’s final defeat in the Second World War, but it was of major significance in the transformation of South Asia and underlined the continuing importance of inspired leadership in complex human endeavours.

The victory in Burma in 1945 also serves as the high-water mark of the British Indian Army.

As this will be our final members event before Christmas, tea and coffee as well as mince pies will be served before the talk begins.

Running order:

1.00pm – Tea, coffee and mince pies
2.00pm – Event begins

About Daniel Marston

Daniel Marston is the Director of the Secretary of Defense Strategic Thinkers Program at the School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. He was previously Professor of Military History at the USMC School for Advanced Warfighting and a Senior Lecturer in War Studies at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. From 2006, he served as a special advisor in Iraq and Afghanistan with the US Army, USMC and the British Army.

Daniel is one of the leading experts on the British Army in Burma during the Second World War and has written several award-winning books on the topic. 

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"First time @NAM_London today. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Thought the presentation & interpretation made the subject accessible..."