• 10am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London
National Army Museum
  • 10am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London

Spotlight: Remembrance

A soldier finds his namesake on a list of the fallen of the First World War, Iraq, 2004
Mark Remembrance Weekend at the National Army Museum by reflecting on how and why we remember all those who have served in the Armed Forces past and present.

Take part in a variety of drop-in and ticketed activities throughout the day. Full programme to be announced soon.

Drop-in activities

The following events are included in your general admission ticket to the Museum and available at various times through the day. Click here to book a general admission time slot.

Archives on Show

Hear and see what it was like to serve in the British Army through documents that soldiers have left behind. Items from the Museum’s archive will be on display, bringing the soldiers’ experiences to life.

Family Ties

Speak to the team from our Templer Study Centre and discover the best ways to research family members who have served in the Armed Forces.

Symbols of Remembrance

Consider the different questions around the act of remembrance and learn how other nations and groups remember.

Chelsea Pensioner Singers

Join the Chelsea Pensioners in the Atrium as they sing a varied programme of music.

Ticketed activities

The following events must be booked individually. Please note that if you book onto one of these events, you do not need to book a general admission ticket to the Museum as well.

Tiny Troopers - 10.00am and 11.20am

Bring your little ones to our fun, sensory sessions exploring poppies and remembrance, perfect for ages 2 to 4.

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The Art of Remembrance - 2.00pm

Join illustrator Oliver Averill to hear his top tips for budding artists and create your own collaged poppy inspired by his book 'We Will Remember Them'. This interactive family workshop is suitable for ages 7+. 

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"First time @NAM_London today. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Thought the presentation & interpretation made the subject accessible..."