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Abram Games in his studio, c1941
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Abram Games and the power of the poster

Abram Games was 'Official War Poster Artist' during the Second World War. Always direct, and occasionally controversial, his posters have left a legacy that continues to influence the art of persuasion used by visual designers today.

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Other ranks' glengarry badge, 44th (East Essex) Regiment, c1874

44th (East Essex) Regiment of Foot

Raised in 1741, this unit served in several campaigns until the British Army reforms of 1881, when it was merged into The Essex Regiment.

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Glengarry badge, other ranks, 56th (West Essex) Regiment, c1876

56th (West Essex) Regiment of Foot

Raised in 1755, this unit served in several campaigns until the Army reforms of 1881, when it was merged into The Essex Regiment.

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Other ranks' cap badge, The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment), c1900

The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment)

This unit was formed during the 1881 reforms. It continued in service until 1959, when it became part of The Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment (Berkshire and Wiltshire).

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Other ranks’ glengarry badge, 62nd (The Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot, c1874

62nd (Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot

This unit was formed in 1756. It served with the British Army until the 1881 reforms, when it became part of The Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment).

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Glengarry badge, other ranks, 99th (Duke of Edinburgh's) Regiment of Foot, c1875

99th Duke of Edinburgh's (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot

This unit was formed in 1824. It served with the British Army until the 1881 Childers Reforms, when it became part of The Duke of Edinburgh’s (Wiltshire Regiment).

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Cap badge, The King's Shropshire Light Infantry, c1903

The King's Shropshire Light Infantry

This unit was formed in 1881 and recruited in Shropshire, Herefordshire and Radnorshire. It served with the British Army until 1968, when it was merged into The Light Infantry.

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Glengarry badge, other ranks, 53rd (Shropshire) Regiment, c1874

53rd (Shropshire) Regiment of Foot

This regiment was raised in 1755. It served in many British Army campaigns until 1881, when it was merged into The King’s Light Infantry (Shropshire Regiment).

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Glengarry badge, 85th (Bucks Volunteers) King's Regiment of Light Infantry, c1874

85th, or The King's Regiment of Light Infantry (Bucks Volunteers)

This unit was raised in 1793. It served with the British Army until the 1881 reforms, when it was merged into The King’s Light Infantry (Shropshire Regiment).

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Other ranks' cap badge, Royal Army Veterinary Corps, c1965

The Royal Army Veterinary Corps

This corps is responsible for the provision, training and care of animals in the British Army. With origins dating back to the 1790s, it has served in many campaigns, including the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Other ranks' cap badge, The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, c1910

The King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

This infantry unit was formed during the 1881 Army reforms. It fought in many campaigns until 1968, when it became part of The Light Infantry.

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Glengarry badge, 51st (2nd Yorkshire West Riding) or The King's Own Light Infantry, c1874

51st (2nd Yorkshire West Riding), or The King's Own Light Infantry Regiment

This infantry unit was raised in 1755. It served until the 1881 Army reforms, when it became part of The King’s Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment).

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Glengarry badge, other ranks, 105th Regiment of Foot (Madras Light Infantry), c1874

105th Regiment of Foot (Madras Light Infantry)

This infantry unit was originally part of the army of the East India Company, but transferred to the British Army in 1862. It became part of The King’s Own Light Infantry during the 1881 reforms.

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