• 10.00am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London
National Army Museum
  • 10.00am - 5.30pm
  • FREE
  • Chelsea, London

Reflecting on the Machine Gun Corps

Cap badge, Machine Gun Corps, c1917

Cap badge, Machine Gun Corps, c1917

Join Richard Fisher and Sir Andrew Graham as they discuss the history of the Machine Gun Corps, and reflect on its impact and legacy, 100 years on from its disbandment.

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The Machine Gun Corps (MGC) was formed in 1915 and saw deployment in all theatres of the First World War. Although in existence for only seven years, the Corps played a vital role in the Allied war effort and left a lasting legacy that is still embraced today.

To mark the centenary year of the disbandment of the MGC, Richard Fisher and Sir Andrew Graham will discuss the history of the Corps, its deployment, the specialist skill of gunnery and, finally, its legacy.

About Richard Fisher

Richard Fisher is a director of the Vickers MG Collection and Research Association, a not-for-profit organisation he founded in 2011 to manage the collection of Vickers machine guns. The organisation manages the physical collection, archive, online material, displays and publishing activities. He is also a Research Fellow with Cranfield University at the Defence Academy and a Trustee of the Small Arms School Corps Infantry Weapons Collection Trust.

About Sir Andrew Graham

Lieutenant General Sir Andrew Graham Bt CB CBE followed in the footsteps of his grandfather, great uncle and cousins when he commissioned into the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. He has commanded infantry soldiers at every level in areas such as Hong Kong, Cyprus and the South Atlantic. He commanded an Infantry Brigade in Northern Ireland, spent six months in Baghdad in 2004 as DCG Multi-National Corps - Iraq, and also commanded the Army Recruiting and Training Division and the Defence Academy at Shrivenham.

He took over as Colonel of The Argylls in 2000, became Colonel of the Royal Regiment of Scotland in 2006, and handed over after eight years as Colonel Commandant of the Infantry (the first) on 31 January 2021.

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